With the economy being as poor as it is, it is unlikely that all teens are going to get the jobs they want. Dr. Daniel J. Siegel, author of Brainstorm — The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain, and a psychiatry professor at University of California, Los Angeles, explains that for teens the natural push against adults is inherently problematic when going for a job interview.” He says their emotions are more intense than ours, and they feel vulnerable and powerless.jobs for teens

Parents should discuss and alert teens to some of the negative consequences of excessive work hours: poor school performance; increased use of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs; and stealing and lying on the job.4 Parents and teachers should monitor the ways teens spend their money.jobs for teens

The economy is working against teens this summer, as are soaring gas prices that have consumers tightening their budgets, according to Rick Elingburg, manager of the N.C. Employment Security Commission office in Asheville, which covers Buncombe, Madison and Yancey counties.

Serious harm accrues to those who stay unemployed for more than a year, and then are unable to find stable jobs after age 20. Those affected in this way are disproportionately minority, poor, and high school dropouts.2 Because of the declining youth population, firms in the future can be expected to focus more attention on job training.jobs for teens

Now, this can be done with people who are over the age of 18 as well, possibly with more freedom, but no matter what, these jobs are also for people under the age of 18 because they are able to create income, but they are also flexible to deal with things such as academics, school events, and extracurricular activities.